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was born in detroit. best export, >> yeah. we had madonna from detroit and also tons of votes for kid rock. i mean music is a huge, huge part of detroit. and, of course, that's it for "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >> good morning, everyone. welcome to a special edition of "morning joe." it's thursday, august 29th. we're going to have a great time here in detroit. we're live from the ford flat rock assembly line. just outside of detroit in flat rock, michigan. and this is an active assembly line, about to get busier as the morning progresses. >> unbelievable news today, ford is actually returning the production of the ford fusion to this plant. >> big news. >> from mexico. it's a $555 million commitment and what does that mean? that means more jobs for americans. >> about 1400. >> great news. >> we're going to speak with ford ceo alan mullally and coo mark fields about this important investment in u.s. manufacturing and what it will mean for the overall economy. >> and we're here to tell the story of detroit as well as the city's bankruptcy, it's been in the news, it'
that is detroit with fox kppv. and tea are it go to wounded reg mint.orgthe>> new information on the death of let are the at this time this is 16 years after the they was on killed a perness>> the rains came in and they rained hard and the storm was slow moving and wuchled a lot of rain in a sort of canned'd period. canned pagscoming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. the last thing i want is to feel like someone is giving me a sales pitch, especially when it comes to my investments. you want a broker you can trust. a lot of guys at the other firms seemed more focused
on to detroit. the city is bankrupt, and finances are in the hands of a manager, but even so voters will turn out for a primary to choose a new mayor. what power would the new mayor wield and who wants that job anyway? >> some really good people want the job. it's quite remarkable. a former sheriff. a form prosecuting attorney. a number of state legislators. really quite -- quite an impressive field considering the reality of the circumstance, which is that governor rick snyder, a conservative republican governor has used a law that he wrote, governor snyder, that the people of michigan rejected in a referendum, that the people of detroit rejected by a 4-1 margin. he has rewritten the law and imposed it. it allows him to take control of the city of detroit's governance and basically steer it whatever direction he wants. most of the candidates for mayor think steering it towards bankruptcy is a bad idea. but in reality they are running for an office where they will basically be spectators to the governance of their city. that's a tragic circumstance. it is anti-democratic at the most extreme.
with salmon that bee in detroit, sam, any updates? i know things are pretty grim over there. >> oh, john t is worse than you could possibly imagine. >> right. >> a once proud american institution brought to its knees by gross mismanagement and incompetent leadership. you know, you wonder if it will ever again be the icon it was once. >> but sam, on the other hand, detroit is resilient, will will bounce back, shortly opinions detroit, no, i'm talking about the daily show. >> come on. >> it took decades to bring detroit to its knees but you destroyed the daily show in like three months. >> whoa, whoa, whoa. go a little easy. >> you're faster than ebola. what? >> i would say that i'm speaking truth to power but you have to power and whatever power you thought you had ends in about six minutes which is less time than it takes to make a hot pocket, but enough time i'm sure for you to [bleep] the show even further until it begs to be put out of its missery. >> thank you, samantha. let's go to jessica williams, jess, where exactly are you. >> i'm in front of paula deen's house, john. >> that is e
in detroit. let's bring in now, former governor of pennsylvania, and nbc news political analyst, ed rendell, also editor in chief of "parade" magazine maggie murphy. the latest issue of "parade" is a labor day report on putting america back to work. let's jump right into it now. manufacturing is returning, about five, six, seven years ago, you start ed realizing tha the cost of producing products in china were going up, the labor prices were going up with fuel costs up, shipping costs a lot more, companies in america started reorganizing. yesterday an extraordinary story about the uaw and ford joining arms, locking arms, 20,000 new jobs coming to detroit right away. i mean, things are really turning around. and you look forward over the next decade, it speeds up. we've got an energy boom coming. the likes of which we haven't seen in 100 years. it's going to get much cheaper to make products in america. >> it's going to get cheaper and the other thing along with companies and sort of the economics that it's good to grow some stuff here, consumers now connect by u.s. products, u.s. jobs. down
. in detroit -- what a show. >> it's where capitalism, pop culture, first amendment, politics all come together. sometimes there's a moment of clarity. that was that moment. >> i'm holding my script close to my face because i'm legal live blind and my contacts don't work right now. in detroit a police commander has mistakenly released a document -- >> oh, come on! come on! look at this. >> i'm going to the merger. go ahead. >> the police department has mistakenly released a document containing the bra size of several female officers in an of the to say who has received bullet-proof vests. come on. come on! >> now back to you. >> hello, san diego. >> hello, san diego. >> all right, we're going to -- >> i have to ask the question because i'm a journalist. >> are you? >> it's a vest. female vest. >> i regret all of this. >> i would like to go back to 6 a.m. east coast and rerack the tape. >> we also want to talk about possible fed choices and the obama care story. >> industry officials are surprised of the move that would prevent the creation of the world's largest airline. nbc's tom costello repo
that came into the detroit bankruptcy was its public pensions. i think the emergency manager in detroit has estimated that the city owes something like $18 billion in debt, $3.5 billion of that in unfunded pension liabilities. jeff mentioned, a lot of things going to a pension funding situation. to them is whether the government is making contributions. thene of them is whether government is making contributions paid that is a problem in detroit. the government has borrowed to make contributions, just like borrowing to pay your monthly bills. not necessarily a good idea or a sustainable. in some cases they might have sweetened the pot. several members are under investigation by the sec. nevertheless, the asset returns that you talked about a couple years ago didn't look so good. for that reason it called attention to the funding of state and local pensions generally. in some ways detroit is its own case and in other ways it brings up the fact that on average, state and local pensions are 80% funded -- i'm sorry, 73% funded. 80% is the target we would like to be. street at thethe capitol are
had the responsibility of trying to raise two young sons on her own, and in a city of detroit, inner city boston, and then back to detroit, after she got her footing. and that was very difficult. she only had a third agreed education. she worked very hard as a domestic. leaving at 5:00 in the morning north getting home until after midnight, going from job to job to job. she just had a disdain for welfare. and the sense that she was very observant and she noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came up a of it, and she just didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life. so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to, and that somehow god would take care of her. and i was an awful student, and -- but i just loved the whole concept of medicine. anytime there was story on television or the radio about medicine, i was right there. i just loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough, a lot of the big medical breakthroughs when i was a little kid seemed to be coming out of johns hopkins so i internalized one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. but i
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. chemical war is a terrible thing, but we have detroit bankrupt, we have illegal aliens, we have so many things in this country that he to be taking care of her it would don't seem to have the time to take care of it hurt i say we should deal with the issues in this place and then we go out and help others. that is all i have got to say. here's what a couple of senators had to say. now is the time for decisive action. the u.s. must rally our friends and actions to take limited to return actions and serious. using standoff weapons without boots on the ground and at minimal risk to our men and women in uniform, we can sit if you can lead assad's airpower and listed missile capabilities and help establish safe areas on the ground. john mccain, lindsey graham, both republicans and united states senate. we have a democrat on the line now. surely from ermine ham alabama -- surely from birmingham alabama. uest: >> brought: assad has not anybody over your to kill us, but our american congress is killing and our american government is killing people right here in the united states. let's fix home
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
had the responsibility of trying to raise two younger sons on her own, in this city of detroit, later inner-city boston and back to detroit after she got her footing and that was very difficult. she only had a third grade education. she worked very hard at cleaning people's houses, leaning at 5:00 in the morning, usually not getting back before midnight going from job to job job. for some reason she had the same for welfare in the sense that she was very observant and noticed that no one she ever saw go on it came off of it and she didn't like the idea of being dependent her whole life so she figured she would work as long and as hard as she needed to and somehow god would take care of her. i was an awful students, but i loved the concept of medicine. any time there was a story on television or radio about medicine i loved hearing about the story. interestingly enough the big medical breakthroughs seemed to come out of johns hopkins. i even internalized as a little kid the one day i wanted to work at johns hopkins. i told my mother wanted to be a doctor. gee think i could be a doctor?
for military benefits, health care, housing, and ten days of marriage leave. >>> a detroit police chief is apologizing after accidently sending out the bra sizes of some female police officers. he says the information was used for measuring bullet proof vests and was an unfortunate clerical error and not done maliciously. >>> the group of powerball winners from oceans county, new jersey, have claimed their share of that jackpot. each will get about $3.8 million after taxes. got to have that hat on, too, when you claim it, right? >>> more and more celebrities are turning to surrogacy in order to become parents. a study released this week by the centers of disease control show infertility rates have not changed in the last 20 years, still affecting 1 in 6 couples. surrogacy has helped people like jimmy fallon live their dream of becoming parents. >> announcer: early today health brought by vagisil. >>> okay, now to business. >> richard, apple stock had its second best day of the year, up 5% after carl icon tweeted he's bought a sizable stake in the iphone maker. i con says he had a friend
're going to see that -- >> in detroit. >> stop it. >> women. it's just going to be horrible. >> all right. >> how can you make cars when you're doing that? it's now -- it's now an industrial problem, willie. >> all morning -- >> why do you think the japanese are beating us? >> miley cyrus. >> miley cyrus. >> we're actually going to take an in-depth look at the causes of the financial crisis that gripped the city and the innovators who were working to dig it out. coming up today on "morning joe" -- >> and twerking. >> stop it. >> chris mathews will be joining us along with the "washington post" david ignatius, financial times gilleyen tett and dr. nancy schneiderman. up next the top stories in the politico playbook. bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning. as far as the rim fire went in california yesterday, firefighters got a little bit of control. not a lot. we went from 7% containment to 20%. it's still threatening the drinking supply, the reservoir that supplies 80% of the water to san francisco. worried about the ashes contaminating the water as the fire continues to
that economic justice required political power. in the two months before the march when king spoke in detroit before a crowd of 150,000, he reminded them there in his version of the "i have a dream" speech in detroit that it was time for blacks to have access to housing and jobs. >> let me get you to pause one second as we watch the president and the first lady now desce descending the stairs. this will be followed by the star-spangled banner performance. you see the president there. his remarks are scheduled around 2:44 p.m. eastern time. it is now 2:12 eastern time. you hear the applause there. professor, again, chris made the point about the president needing to address some of these current issues. double-digit unemployment rate for african-americans and to equate it to what we experienced then and sadly the numbers that exist today. >> no, it's a great point. i mean, again, when barack obama was elected president, it was important for many african-americans to see him as a realization of that political power. for many, he realized that vision -- >> let me pause you as we listen to the na
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
[ bleep ] story. >>> detroit police calling it an unprecedented case. a woman found dead, burned in a detroit apartment days after two other women were also found attacked. both left for dead in a nearby vacant field. one of them with burn marks on her body. cnn's rosa flores joins me with more on this one. and rosa, what are police saying? are they connecting these women at all? >> reporter: you know, that's the big question. i just got off the phone with detroit police, and the public information officer there tells me that they are investigating these three cases separately. right now they don't believe that these cases are related. but here is what we know. the latest body was discovered after detroit firefighters put out an apartment fire saturday. the woman has not been identified, but investigators do say that she is in her 20s. now, the medical examiner has not determined the cause of death at this point in time. here's what's very interesting. a week earlier to the day on jewel 27th, a 30-year-old woman was found physically assaulted in a vacant field. her continue is un
, responsibility. not just some. >> you know, lee, in detroit where they just filed bankruptcy, they are actually talking about messing with people's pension. that the autobillionaires companies got bailed out and they're talking about taking workers pensions. and people want to know why we're marching? >> the retirees pensions in detroit average $19,000 a year. yet they want to attack the workers, they want to attack retirees. we've got to say no. we are not going to let that happen. they are using workers as scapegoats. that's one of the reasons we're out here tomorrow and we're going to be here until we're able to fight successfully for workers rights all over this country. it is a shame that folks would go after a retiree who makes $19,000 a year expecting they can sacrifice more. we've got to say no to that, al. all of us. our communities, our coalition partners, labor unions. we've got to say that's unacceptable in the richest country on the face of the earth. >> dennis, the speech we all remember was "i have a dream." but the person who called this march 50 years ago was a labor leader nam
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
history moved deeper into the yosemite national park. >>> the city of detroit getting a makeover. the state plans to demolish nearly 4,000 abandoned homes to remove urban blight. >>> and health officials in texas working to contain a measles outbreak linked to a so-called mega church. i'm john siegenthaler. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome b
sports? and the reason i ask you that is because i interviewed the detroit tigers and i asked them, would you feel comfortable with a gay player coming out on the detroit tigers and they said, what's the big deal? is it different in the world of baseball than it is in the world of football? >> i don't think so, actually. i think we do athletes a disservice by assuming that they are all neandrethals. i've found that most don't care what the sexual orientation is. it allows everyone a voice in the conversation. so i don't believe that there is one sport that is more or less homophobic. i just think that athletes are not given the opportunity to prove how accepting that they are. >> i ask you these questions because in the world of sports, especially in football, you see many religious players, social conservatives. >> yeah. you know, i think that religion is important and the one thing that we do is try to meet the players or anyone where they are at. if there's a player that has a religious concern about playing with an lgbt player, we want to have that conversation, do it in an open and h
. they have not voted yet i don't think this will change because they can see what is happening detroit has just gone bankrupt and relied on gm and chrysler and ford they do not want to go the way of detroit to one of the pensions will be smaller you know, you'll end up with less at the end of the day. >> with the individual company you can change it if you change jobs in ticket with you that is the advantage. if you want to move to a better job you can without investing in your pension. tracy: give them props for trying. i don't know what they're thinking. [laughter] great to be with you. ashley: they go to the south because the state's give tax advantages nissan moved to just south of nashville for that reason so it makes sense. amazon moving into a new business rolling out where people can buy a fine art from people and galleries nearly 40,000 works by 5,000 artist but the well-known names are bringing in the big bucks the most expensive item norman rockwell going after four-point a million dollars. it's still works even with him in the war hall -- andy warhol. >> you would think you wo
his weight set and just lifts weights. >> do it alone. >> get out of our way. >> detroit free press, one of the largest -- >> did you see that. >> publicly owned muse seems may be the next victim of detroit's bankruptcy filing. christies will appraise the value of all city-owned items at the detroit institute of art. this is sad. >> it is. >> featuring works from van gogh and deyeahgo rivera. the request came from creditors owed $18 billion. >> the city manager said of detroit, the city manager said they're lazy, stupid -- >> there's a lot of people now accusing everybody and trying to get in the way of the bankruptcy filing. >> the "usa today," last year, 1.35 million kids went to the e for sports-related injuries. a survey says that equates to a hospital visit every 25 seconds. the report estimates those injuries caused more than $900 million last year. >> from our parade of papers "seattle times" prolonged use of high blood pressure medication may lead to an increase risk for breast cancer for older women. in a survey of 2700 women, the rate of breast cancer doubled among those w
detroit and birmingham county. those are not priorities. >> what should the white house do. what would dr. king say to barack obama today? >> he would be delighted that we have in him, president obama, the crown jewel of our struggle. he that done an incredible job making the case for a better nation. on the other hand, president obama would be in the asks i say, in the johnson lincoln lane, dr. king in the douglas lane appealing to the president. i think they need president obama to deem with the lyndon johnson moment. he gave us solid analysis, and appropriation and legislation. we need now, 30% black unemployment, we need appropriation and legislation to close these tremendous gaps. >> reverend jackson, we go back many years, thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you, sir. >> i hope you enjoy your day down on the mall. >> indeed. >> coverage continues today on aljazeera and aljazeera.com. we will have special coverage from the lincoln memorial at 2:00 eastern time. >> we turn now to the weather situation across the country, where they are wondering what it is going to be like
for detroit and made sure that we saved the car manufacturers and all the jobs that went with it. i think he would also be questioning about why there aren't more people from wall street who have gone to jail at this time. but i think he would be very proud, and perhaps have some questions as well. >> ben jealous, thank you, as always. we appreciate it. >>> ahead on "newsroom," as the u.s. considers military intervention in syria, our security analysts with a lot of experience in troubled spots calls this the problem from hell for the united states. we'll be talking to peter bergen up ahead. with new phillips' fiber good gummies. they're fruity delicious! just two gummies have 4 grams of fiber! to help support regularity! i want some... [ woman ] hop on over! [ marge ] fiber the fun way, from phillips'. >>> crisis in syria has increasingly become a u.s. problem. it is a big problem. our national security analyst peter bergen summed up some of the issues in an op-ed on our website cnn.com. he writes here, i'm quoting, "whoever ultimately prevails in this fight is hardly going to be an ally of
, he did one in 1960 to '61. another in detroit. so he put them all together to deliver this incredible message that moved the nation and our world. >> that crescendo that came at the end, that build, the speech was kind of prosaic, then he started talking my country 'tis of thee from the song. and the references to the bible and shakespeare. "the new york times" today pointed out -- people are going to be studying this for years. the source material of the bible, of shakespeare, of woody guthrie, of the declaration and documents all enriching that one statement. in 17 minutes. >> i mean, that's the brilliance of it. that was the brilliance of who he as an orator was. and "i have a dream" is probably one of the most well-known speeches on the planet. >> around the world. >> around the world. unquestionably. and i think certainly today represented some of that. with all the coverage from rural networks. i've done so many things from bbc that i've ever done in my life. but because of the importance of this message. >> what's it like when you hear him say on tape again my four little child
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
of detroit of their pensions. they worked hard for these pensions. [applause] and let me tell you something, if they, if we stand by while they take the detroiters pensions, they'll be taking our pensions. so don't think it won't happen to us. if they can set a precedent, they'll do it to us again. you know, let me just tell you this: inequality is a scourge on our society. and, yes, we're talking about low-wage workers making $7.25 an hour, we've got to do something about it. but there's the other side of that, the other side of that is that some people are doing pretty good. so between 1979 and 2007, 20, you know, a period of a it little bit less than 20 years, real income rose by 240% for those at the top 1. it's a shameful thing. it is a moral issue. and we have got to fight back at this. let me tell you this, our economy is capable be of producing -- capable of producing enough good paying jobs for everyone. [applause] our economy can do it. this economy can do it. but we can't do it while we're getting trade deals that are shipping our jobs overseas that just leaned on us if a few mon
detroit worked and experience all of its own. but there's been a marriage between the civil rights movement and the social justice movement for a long time. and as we come to this 50th anniversary, i can recall watching mr. randolph, and certainly dr. king, in that sort of electrifying speech that was given that day, and i want to go back something myrlie said earlier, and that is the movement, i mean the media has really played with our mind for a long time. you know, the most exciting part of dr. king's speech and when te that gave folks so much energy was when he talked about his dream, both for himself, his people and the nation as a whole. but dr. king said some stuff before he got to that part of the speech. that you very seldom hear folks talk about. he was just talking about we came to washington, d.c. you know, which was in a sense of promissory note written by the founders of the nation that spoke to the fact that we were entitled to some stuff. life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness. and when i heard the speech, i was a young leader, a local unit of about 5000 folks. i
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
are upset because i correctly said that republicans trashed the city of detroit. >> this will shock you and shock some of your viewers. there are many, many republicans in congress right now, perhaps the majority, who not only are opposed to raising the minimum wage, they want to abolish the minimum wage. >> these guys are so used to going to their man cave at fox. >> why are you attributing that to women in the work force? >> excuse me. let me just finish what i'm saying, if i may, oh, dominant one. >> where they are stroked and petted and egos are flattered. >> heavenly father, thank you for senator ted cruz of texas. there is no moral or religious case for taking away health care from 30 million americans. make no mistake, a photo op with president obama does not make chris christie bipartisan. accepting disaster relief, which was the right thing to do, does not make chris christie bipartisan. i have met the governor, and said, why don't you come on "the ed show" sometime? he doesn't need to come on my program, and quite honestly, i don't need to interview him. i have all the informa
: yeah, right. and claim the same thing. >> yeah, felt threatened. >> stephanie: yeah. paul in detroit, you are on the "stephanie miller show." hello, paul. >> caller: good morning, stephanie. gentlemen, how are you? >> stephanie: good morning. >> caller: i'm from detroit, i'm a marine corps combat engineer. i'm saying that so you know i have been around a variety verse group of friends. the police officer didn't say stop, he said don't. stop would be like he is doing it currently. he might have said don't play with your gun while i go look at your license. >> stephanie: why did he have to tell him to calm down twice? >> caller: because he was probably agitated. i'm not taking that away from him. i don't know. i guess i get confused, because i don't understand why -- why this situation -- is so important in the black culture and other people for that matter -- >> stephanie: in the black culture? >> caller: yes. >> stephanie: i think it's important to anyone that thinks that unarmed teenagers shouldn't be shot dead when they are walking home -- >> caller: he was a 17 year old 6-foot --
are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for the intervention in iraq. said it leads to a moral and spiritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. of theeaming constitutional right to vote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over gills. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. to restoreng foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. graduations and los feliz. keep the faith. keep hope alive though. -- keep hope alive. the lord is our life. >> ♪ >> our next speaker is is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar christiann, and the product company. >> we must stand an hour ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am honored to be here today. for the last 88 years,
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
. detroit birmingham bankruptcy. we're still paying an awful price for iraq. too much war, too little social uplift. ratings as killed, his went down. his status went up. so keep dreaming of the constitutional right to vote, stop the madness in north carolina and texas. keep dreaming. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. to go from sovereign thrift to sovereign employ, education, housed, choose schools over jails. keep dreaming. student loan debt forgiveness. keep dreaming. revise the u.s. civil rights commission. keep dreaming. restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming. immigration reform that includes africa, haiti and the cribions. keep dreaming. 50 years later we are free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. and more graduation. and so keep the faith. and through it all keep lives. the lord is our light. >> our next speaker is attorney patricia rhodes, president national bar association, president of the washington bar association, legal funding, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our grounds for justice. we must stand our grounds for justice. on beha
. homeowners are locked up. insurance companies are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for he intervention in iraq. he said it leads to a moral and piritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. keep dreaming of the constitutional right to ote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over jails. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. keep dreaming to restore foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. more graduations and less funerals. keep the faith. keep hope alive. he lord is our life. ♪ ♪ >> our next speaker is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar association, and the christian product company. >> we must stand our ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am h
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
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